#1,112 – Internationalization vs. Localization

Internationalization and localization both deal with adapting software to run as expected under a variety of different languages and/or geographic regions.

Internationalization, typically abbreviated as “i18n”, is the process of making changes to an application so that it could potentially later be adapted to one or more languages or regions.

Internationalization

  • Encompasses the things that you do just once, rather than once per target language/region
  • Must be done before localization
  • Includes activities like
    • Storing strings as Unicode
    • Being aware of regional settings when converting between numeric data and strings
    • Moving localizable resources into “satellite assemblies”
    • Removing hard-code constraints for certain UI elements

Localization, typically abbreviated as “l10n”, is the process of adapting an application for a specific language or region.

Localization

  • Is done once for each targeted language/region
  • Includes activities like
    • Translating strings for a particular language
    • Adjusting UI, as needed, to fit translated elements

About Sean
Software developer in the Twin Cities area, passionate about .NET technologies. Equally passionate about my own personal projects related to family history and preservation of family stories and photos.

5 Responses to #1,112 – Internationalization vs. Localization

  1. Pingback: #1,113 – Use of Cultures in Internationalization | 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

  2. Pingback: #1,115 – Internationalization I – Obey CurrentCulture for Output | 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

  3. Pingback: #1,117 – Internationalization II – Obey CurrentCulture for Input | 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

  4. Pingback: #1,121 – Localization II – Assigning UIDs to All Localizable Elements | 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

  5. Pingback: #1,122 – Localization III – Updating UIDs after Initial Creation | 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

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