#372 – Defining Tooltips for GUI Elements

A tooltip is a small popup that appears when a user hovers the mouse pointer over some user interface element.  It’s typically used to provide further information about the element that the user hovers over.

In WPF, you can set a textual tooltip by setting the Tooltip property of a control (inherited from FrameworkElement or FrameworkContentElement class).

    <StackPanel>
        <Label Content="Buy a Tractor:" />
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" >
            <Label Content="Brand:"/>
            <RadioButton Content="Deere" ToolTip="Nothing runs like a Deere"/>
            <RadioButton Content="New Holland" ToolTip="Smart Design. Built Strong. Farm Raised."/>
            <RadioButton Content="Kubota" ToolTip="The Orange Way"/>
        </StackPanel>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" >
            <Label Content="Series:" />
            <ComboBox SelectedIndex="0" >
                <ComboBoxItem Content="BX Series" ToolTip="Little guy"/>
                <ComboBoxItem Content="B Series" ToolTip="18-32hp, smaller landscaping"/>
                <ComboBoxItem Content="TLB Series" ToolTip="21-59hp, professional"/>
                <ComboBoxItem Content="L Series" ToolTip="30-59HP, larger landscaping"/>
                <ComboBoxItem Content="M Series" ToolTip="43-135hp, all-purpose agricultural"/>
            </ComboBox>
        </StackPanel>
        <Button Content="Buy It" ToolTip="Charge my credit card and send me my tractor" />
    </StackPanel>
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About Sean
Software developer in the Twin Cities area, passionate about software development and sailing.

3 Responses to #372 – Defining Tooltips for GUI Elements

  1. Mike says:

    It’s also worth noting that you can have more advanced tooltips:

    Heading
    Description blah blah blah
    <StackPanel

    The RSS feed for this site is one of my favourite RSS feeds – keep up the good work 🙂

  2. Pingback: #873 – Using a Popup Rather than a Tooltip | 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

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