#216 – Defining Several Different Gradient Stops in a Gradient Fill

When defining a gradient fill, you can include a number of different gradient stops.  For each stop, you define the color that the gradient should be at that stop (set Color property), and the location of the stop along the gradient line, from 0.0 to 1.0 (Offset property).

Here’s an example of a left-to-right gradient that has five different stops:

		<Button Content="5 stops - Red, Green, Orange, Blue, Pink" Height="200" Width="300">
			<Button.Background>
				<LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0.5" EndPoint="1,0.5">
					<GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.0"/>
					<GradientStop Color="Green" Offset="0.2"/>
					<GradientStop Color="Orange" Offset="0.5"/>
					<GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.9"/>
					<GradientStop Color="Pink" Offset="1.0"/>
				</LinearGradientBrush>
			</Button.Background>
		</Button>


Here’s a gradient brush that defines the seven colors of the rainbow.

                <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0.5" EndPoint="1,0.5">
                    <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.0"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Orange" Offset="0.17"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.33"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Green" Offset="0.5"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.67"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Indigo" Offset="0.83"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Violet" Offset="1.0"/>
                </LinearGradientBrush>

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About Sean
Software developer in the Twin Cities area, passionate about .NET technologies. Equally passionate about my own personal projects related to family history and preservation of family stories and photos.

3 Responses to #216 – Defining Several Different Gradient Stops in a Gradient Fill

  1. Pingback: #226 – Gradient Fills Adjust to the Size of the Control « 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

  2. Pingback: #531 – Adjusting a Gradient Using the Gradient Tool « 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

  3. Pingback: #546 – Adding Gradient Stops in Blend « 2,000 Things You Should Know About WPF

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